positional changes & standard deviation

Rebeckah

Member
To figure out the positional changes chart:
list each game in order then the next columns would be the amount the winning number has gone up or down from the previous winning number... in that position. i.e.:
winning numbers:
1-14-24-34-36-{1}
9-14-19-21-26-{24}
the change per position would be:
P1... P2... P3... P4... P5... P6
+8... 0... -5... -13... -10... +23

This is your change per position value. Colouring the negatives may help in distinguishing the +/- . I make a line graph with this data. I also total how many times each #change has hit. This can show you a range of changes that have occured most frequently.

So, how do you use this info? When you know your range is +/-4 from your previous winning number, you can get a positional range for the draw comming up. In this example, position 1 would have a range of 5-13. You can then use that range as a positional filter for your wheeling, or just look harder at #s within that range.

Another aspect is predicting the direction of the next draw. An up/down pattern can sometimes emerge quite regularly. Predicting a specific direction will eliminate 1/2 of your range. so instead of +/-4, your range becomes -4. A VERY tight filter, but I have found it to be pretty accurate when there's a clear indication. Again, this is a really tight filter & I reccomend only using it when you have a really strong feeling about the direction.

This chart will also show if one number hits alot. Like in my game, a positional change of 8 occurs most frequently, so I would add 8 to last draws winning #s, and check if my new #s look strong & include them in my set.

You can also track when each change hits, thus helping you predict a due change value. Making something similar to a skip & hit chart would work.

Your next chart would be the standard deviation chart which charts the difference each winning number has from the game average. You get this by getting the average for each position, then noting the difference of the winning # from the average.

This is what I do, it may not be the *official* mathematical standard deviation technique. ? Standard disclaimers apply. Can any of you other gamers & math/lotto whizes add anything here? Any comments?
 

winhunter

Member
WINHunter

WINHunter does both of these. Oh hmmm... Now you got me wondering if I need to add an Ordered/Unordered option to the Position Processor.... (Will add it anyway)


Either one of these tests, or both can be performed. The big question everyone always asks is... "How much history do I use?" WINHunter helps you figure that out for each of these functions individually, or when you process them together. I guess what helps the user, is that the processor matches what they are looking for to process numbers.


Andrew
 

Beaker

Member
How about frequency counts for changes by position ;)
So, in your example

1-14-24-34-36-{1}

Counts for #1

skip... counts
0..... 10
1..... 15
2..... 14
3....... 9
4..... 10
5....... 4
6 .......5
7 .......7
8 .......4
9 ......15
10......1
11......0
 
Beaker said:
How about frequency counts for changes by position ;)
So, in your example

1-14-24-34-36-{1}

Counts for #1

skip... counts
0..... 10
1..... 15
2..... 14
3....... 9
4..... 10
5....... 4
6 .......5
7 .......7
8 .......4
9 ......15
10......1
11......0
This positionning stuff joined with delta pairing might worth a lot..... :agree: :agree2:
 

peter

Member
I ve got something great to talk about in the next few days, its about width of line combined with the position of the first and 6th position, and how it relates to odd/& even, it will involve announcers, and this is where Dennis, you and Beaker come in. more later.:read:
 

Beaker

Member
peter said:
And who was one of the first to start taking about positioning.
Open number by position = you. By now you should have these frequencies by position. :p:

What gets me is that we had someone, Lin Shen I believe, that did stuff by position then poof gone. People don;t understand, this is a marathon, an exploration for hidden treasure - it's going to take along time.

Finding the direction of change by position is great as Rebeckah has said, but the frequencies can help with that and tie that with open numbers by position, getting a number then using deltas to help, you could have a nice find there. :eek:

Oh well, :notme: I guess people don't want the BIG cheque ;)
 

Irvin

Member
Hello Beaker, Dennis, Rebeckah, Andrew and Peter :wavey:

Excuse my ignorance but can you please explain frequency counts.

I looked at what Beaker listed against number 1 and it just went right over my head :confused:

I presume you mean the history of how many times number 1 has been drawn and the gap between draws?

ie skips = 0 means drawn again in the next draw?

Hey I think I just answered my own question.

Just didn't see the whole picture....Need more sustanance.

Thank you

:D
 

Beaker

Member
You got it Irvin - skip 0 would be drawn in the next draw, skip 1 would be the number 2 drawn in the next draw.

Skip isn't the right word : no: should be ummm delta. so 1 with a delta of 0 is 1, 1 with delta of 1 is 2, 1 with delta of 2 is 3, 1 with delta of 3 is 4 etc,

This is just an example Irvin. The 'positional delta' is just the difference between this draw and the next by position.

It is not just the difference between draws for each number but by position. :agree:
 

Irvin

Member
Beaker :wavey:

So does that mean you have to look at this from unsorted data?

ie if it was sorted there would be no positional change for 1 since in a sorted draw it would always take position 1.

:D
 

Beaker

Member
Irvin said:
Beaker :wavey:

So does that mean you have to look at this from unsorted data?

ie if it was sorted there would be no positional change for 1 since in a sorted draw it would always take position 1.

:D
The positional deltas would be different for sorted and unsorted :agree:

1 would always hit in position 1 - correct BUT the delta would be different.

But I think sorted is what you want to see.

Consider the following draws:

1. 01-09-16-23-44-45
2. 08-10-19-20-31-49
3. 04-05-10-33-35-44
4. 10-15-18-20-39-40

The positional deltas would be

2. 7,1,3,-3,-13,4
3. -4,-5,-9,13,4,-5
4. 6,10,8,-13,4,-4
 

Irvin

Member
Beaker,

Definitely back on track now.... I just need more sleep and sutanance for the brain to recoup.

This site has bombarded me with so many ideas just need to absorb and understand.

:lol: :lol:
 
Beaker said:
Open number by position = you. By now you should have these frequencies by position. :p:

What gets me is that we had someone, Lin Shen I believe, that did stuff by position then poof gone. People don;t understand, this is a marathon, an exploration for hidden treasure - it's going to take along time.

Finding the direction of change by position is great as Rebeckah has said, but the frequencies can help with that and tie that with open numbers by position, getting a number then using deltas to help, you could have a nice find there. :eek:

Oh well, :notme: I guess people don't want the BIG cheque ;)
Peter you ignited a nice trail to explore here...we have to chart it up... :agree:
 

peter

Member
peter said:
I ve got something great to talk about in the next few days, its about width of line combined with the position of the first and 6th position, and how it relates to odd/& even, it will involve announcers, and this is where Dennis, you and Beaker come in. more later.:read:
What I'm looking at is to see if the width of line number is either an odd number or an even number.
There are four ways to generate either an even number or a odd number.
I have four designations.
FE= First Even
FO= First Odd
LE= Last Even
LO=Last Odd
Now in order to obtain an even width of line number, one of two combinations will occur.
1)FE&LE= even
2)FO&LO= even
Now in order to obtain an odd width of line number, one of the two must occur,
1)FE&LO= odd
2)FO&LE=odd
Now if we chart all of the width of line numbers, and determine which are the best announcers, if we correctly identify which width of line number is coming, we will know whether it is an odd, or even width of line, once we determine that, we can break down that width of line number, and we can identify the first and sixth number, once we have two numbers we can apply some of our other tools, such as LD's, consecutives, etc, I hope this makes sense, I await your comments plse. :agree2:
 

peter

Member
Good idea, I'll let you start it and either move this over or copy it, I haven't fiqured out how to do that yet.:agree2:
 
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